“We accept the reality of the world with which we are presented.” So says Christof (This and subsequent quotes and descriptions are from The Truman Show, prod. Scott Rudin, dir. Peter Weir, 103 min., Paramount, 1998, videocassette.). Truman Burbank is the star of his own television show; . . . Only he doesn’t know it. Truman is the first child legally adopted by a corporation. All this action takes place in the largest man-made studio ever constructed. Truman lives on Seahaven Island, a fictional place where everything is controlled, everything except Truman. The Truman Show, created and produced by Christof, generates tremendous revenues through product placement. Truman’s best friend shows up with a special brand of beer. His wife brags about this new kitchen aid that peels, slices, and dices. And wouldn’t you want to drink Mococoa, made from the world’s finest cocoa beans, grown on the upper slopes of Mt. Nicaragua. The producers are forced to manufacture ways to keep Truman on the island. You simply can’t have Truman leaving his world.
The outside world watches, enraptured by the occurrences of Truman’s life. They watch as he grows, they watch as he dates and gets married. They watch as he mows the lawn. They watch as he sleeps.
Everything in this fictional world starts to unravel as Truman begins to realize that everything revolves around him. His entire life is recorded on over 5,000 cameras. Until day 10,913. Truman escapes. He escapes from the world of the cameras. He escapes from the watchful eye of the producers. He escapes from his little island. Truman comes to realize all that he has believed was false, a facade. From the manufactured weather and traffic jams; to his everyday encounters with his neighbors. “Good morning. And in case I don’t see ya, . . . good afternoon, good evening, and good night.” Each morning is the same.
His marriage is fake, his best friend is fake, his job is fake. The buses, the newsstand, the elevators are all fake. All is meant to keep him in his place. All his world is a play and each person an actor, all playing a part for his benefit.
All until Truman escapes. He sails away from his little island. As Truman stands on the edge, before the open door, the door between the only world he has ever known and the door he now believes to lead to reality: Christof speaks:
“Truman . . . You can speak. I can hear you.”
“Who are you?”
“I am the creator . . . of a television show. A show that gives hope and joy and inspiration to millions.”
“Then, who am I?”
“You are the star.”
“Was nothing real?”
“You were real. That’s what made you so good to watch. Listen to me. There’s no more truth out there than there is in the world I created for you. Out there are lies, deceit; but in my world you have nothing to fear.
“I know you better than you know yourself. I was there when you were born, when you took your first step; for the episode where you lost your first tooth.
“You can’t leave. . . . You belong here . . . with me.”
Truman turns. “In case I don’t see ya, good afternoon, good evening, and good night.” He bows deeply and then exits.
In many ways we live in a world much like The Truman Show. The Prince of this world would like to lie to us. “I know you better than you know yourself. I was there when you were born, when you took your first step; for the episode where you lost your first tooth. . . You can’t leave. . . . You belong here . . . with me.” And so it is. Our world is so ordered that it makes it extremely difficult to change, to move into a new realm. And Satan would like nothing more than to keep us in his world.
In what ways do you experience the two realities: our world and God’s world?

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